Compressed Air Hose Safety

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Compressed air is a very useful thing however it can be dangerous and must be used in a safe manner. Here are some tips when using a compressed air.

General Use

  • Keep air hose off the floor where it is a trip hazard and subject to damage by trucks, doors, and dropped tools. During a recent audit of our facility we found many unused air hoses laying across the floor, many attached to a self-retracting reel.
  • Prevent sharp objects from rubbing against the hose. Be especially careful if the hose gets wedged in a corner or hung around a machine. Always go to the point where the hose is stuck and guide it. Don’t pull on the hose trying to free it.
  • Prior to use, ensure the quick-connect is properly seated and there is no apparent damage to the hose or fittings. Weak points may swell like a balloon and burst, throwing pieces of hose in every direction. This may also cause the hose to thrash about dangerously.
  • If your area doesn’t have a self-retracting reel, always coil the hose—without kinks—and hang it over a broad support, not over a hook, nail, or angle iron, when not in use.

When using it to blow dust and debris:

  • Ensure you are wearing goggles or a face shield to protect your face and eyes. Air in excess of 30 lbs. can blow an eye from its socket, and/or rupture an eardrum.
  • Always utilize a OSHA approved air nozzle that reduces our 90 lb. air down to a safe level for such use.
  • Never aim the hose at yourself or someone else.
  • Never use compressed air to clean off your body. Air pressure against the skin may penetrate deeply to cause internal hemorrhage and intense pain.
  • Keep air hose off the floor where it is a trip hazard and subject to damage by trucks, doors, and dropped tools.

This toolbox topic was reviewed by ______________________________________ on ___________________________ with the following employees:

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